National Legal Director Aclu

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B. Compliance with legal obligations to which BMW is subject (Art. 6 para. 1 c, f) EU. read more David Cole was a faculty member at Georgetown University Law Center from 1990 to 2016. He has also taught at New York University School of Law and the School of Public Policy at University College London as a visiting scholar. As a professor, Cole`s main areas of expertise were constitutional law, criminal procedure, national security, and federal court law in the United States. He was hired at Georgetown University of Law in 1994 and was elected the school`s first George J. Mitchell Professor of Law and Public Order.[6] [2]. [1] He has published in a variety of areas of law, including constitutional law, national security, criminal justice, civil liberties, law and literature.

Cole has represented several important First Amendment cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, as well as a number of influential civil rights and national security cases. He is also a legal correspondent for several mainstream media and publications. ACLU-CO is seeking a creative, dynamic and visionary General Counsel to lead the growth of the ACLU-CO legal department in advancing and shaping Colorado`s civil rights landscape. The General Counsel reports to the Executive Director and is a member of the ACLU-CO`s executive team to ensure legal strategies are aligned to support the organization`s long-term thematic priorities. The General Counsel is responsible for the overall strategy, coordination and administration of the Legal Department, including its litigation, staff and network of cooperative volunteer advisors. David Cole teaches constitutional law, national security and criminal justice at Georgetown University Law Center. He is also a legal affairs correspondent for The Nation and a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books. He has been published in law journals and popular press, including the Yale Law Journal, California Law Review, Stanford Law Review, New York Times, Washington Post, The New Republic, Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times. He is the author of seven books. Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror, published in 2007 and co-authored with Jules Lobel, won the Palmer Civil Liberties Award for Best Book on National Security and Civil Liberties. Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism, won the American Book Award in 2004.

No Equal Justice: Race and Class in the American Criminal Justice System was named Best Nonfiction Book of 1999 by the Boston Book Review and Best Book of 1999 on a National Policy Issue by the American Political Science Association. His most recent book is The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009). Cole was appointed co-chair of the Freedom and Security Committee of the Draft Constitution in 2001[5] and joined the Advisory Committee of the Draft Policy on Freedom of Expression in 2003. [4] He has served on the boards of a number of public interest organizations, including the Human Rights Watch Advisory Committee, the Bill of Rights Committee, and the American Bar Association`s Standing Committee on Law and National Security. Most recently, he appeared before the Supreme Court in 2010 when he challenged the impact of the First and Fifth Amendments prohibiting “material support” to terrorist groups by the U.S. PATRIOT Act in Holder v. Humanitarian Law Project, 561 U.S. 1 (2010). From 2013 to 2014, Cole was a member of the Open Society Foundations, an international fundraising network founded by business magnate George Soros that distributes financial contributions to various liberal and progressive political causes in the United States. In today`s episode of “So to Speak,” Wall Street Journal Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin interviews Cole about his new work, examining some of the world`s hottest First Amendment topics: burning flags, campaign finance reform, which can be done legally against growing concerns about “fake news,” and more. We are committed to creating a work environment that practices fair and inclusive treatment. We work diligently to prevent and combat harassment or discrimination of any kind.

Cole was appointed co-chair of the Freedom and Security Committee of the Draft Constitution[5] in 2001 and joined the Advisory Committee of the Draft Policy on Freedom of Expression in 2003. [4] He has served on the boards of a number of public interest organizations, including the Human Rights Watch Advisory Committee, the Bill of Rights Committee, and the American Bar Association`s Standing Committee on Law and National Security. His last appearance before the Supreme Court was in 2010, when he challenged the impact of the First and Fifth Amendments on the prohibition of “material support” of terrorist groups in Holder v. Humanitarian Law Project, 561 U.S. 1 (2010).